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<p><img src="/uploads/Emma.jpg" style="width:463px;height:659px"><br></p><p><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-family:Arial, sans-serif">When I was a child I used
to love watching TV ads. &nbsp;I knew all the words to all the songs in the
commercials and still do - much to my children’s amusement. &nbsp;The 48 sheet
posters in London were also brilliant. &nbsp;They were an art form in their own
right. &nbsp;Campaigns for the Greater London Council , Silk Cut cigarettes and
ITV were some of my favourites. &nbsp;I always wondered, who were the people
that came up with these ideas? &nbsp;Little did I know that one day I would end
up working for some of them. Today it seems more difficult to get really
creative ideas into mainstream media; the appetite for risk is not there
amongst clients. &nbsp;You tend to see the more innovative stuff on the web and
social media platforms.</span></p>
<p>It’s really interesting to
look at the difference between countries who are fairly new to creative
advertising and those who have been doing it for a long time. &nbsp;The newer
markets tend to be more exciting. &nbsp;They take bigger risks. &nbsp;The
older, more ‘sophisticated’ markets are producing more conservative, safer work
on the whole. &nbsp;Of course, there are exceptions to this rule but this is my
view based on my judging at lots of awards juries over many years. &nbsp;Brazil
and South America generally have given us some truly amazing work recently
whereas the UK and the US not so much so. &nbsp;This might be because the UK
and US are global hubs and have to make work that is suitable for many
different markets. Or it might be because there are lots of levels of clients
and focus groups! My prediction for the future? &nbsp;Keep an eye on Africa and
Russia.</p>
<p>American’s tend to value
the sheer amount of work produced. &nbsp;They are focused on the quantity of
output; they work incredibly hard and have few holidays. &nbsp;In Europe we
tend to be a little more relaxed about things and we do love lots of theory and
research! In markets that have emerged and matured in recent years, the Far
East and South America, there is still a real buzz, an energy. &nbsp;While in
markets such as Australia and New Zealand they are refreshingly &nbsp;straight
forward in their approach to creativity and business in general.</p>
<p>I’d be a detective. &nbsp;A
super sleuth. Maybe I’ve watched way too much TV but I think it would be
absolutely fascinating. &nbsp;I reckon I’d be pretty good at catching
criminals.</p>
<p>David Droga is the person
in advertising who inspires me. &nbsp;No one else comes close. Everyone at
Ogilvy in London is probably bored rigid with my quoting David Droga at them.
&nbsp;And constantly referencing Droga5 work. &nbsp;</p>
<p>Digital ads won’t
completely displace print ads so long as print is a medium we engage with.
&nbsp;And I believe it will be. Very few innovations completely surplant
pre-existing stuff. &nbsp;But they may cause the latter to change somewhat.
&nbsp;Look at bookshops. &nbsp;The advent of Amazon did not cause them to disappear
but they have evolved. Now they serve coffee or wine and host book club events.
&nbsp;They are social gathering spaces as well as just being retailers.
&nbsp;So print ads will not die but they may evolve to be more relevant to the
way we live now.</p>
<p>I obviously could not live
without my husband and children, I’m sure most people will agree. &nbsp;So my
five things are in addition to them;</p>
<p>The changing seasons in
London.</p>
<p>Firework Night.</p>
<p>Black Taxis.</p>
<p>My Nan’s recipe for chicken
soup.</p>
<p>The wildlife in the city.</p>
Interview with Emma De La Foss
25 August 2014

<p><img src="/uploads/Emma.jpg" style="width:463px;height:659px"><br></p><p><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-family:Arial, sans-serif">When I was a child I used to love watching TV ads. &nbsp;I knew all the words to all the songs in the commercials and still do - much to my children’s amusement. &nbsp;The 48 sheet posters in London were also brilliant. &nbsp;They were an art form in their own right. &nbsp;Campaigns for the Greater London Council , Silk Cut cigarettes and ITV were some of my favourites. &nbsp;I always wondered, who were the people that came up with these ideas? &nbsp;Little did I know that one day I would end up working for some of them. Today it seems more difficult to get really creative ideas into mainstream media; the appetite for risk is not there amongst clients. &nbsp;You tend to see the more innovative stuff on the web and social media platforms.</span></p> <p>It’s really interesting to look at the difference between countries who are fairly new to creative advertising and those who have been doing it for a long time. &nbsp;The newer markets tend to be more exciting. &nbsp;They take bigger risks. &nbsp;The older, more ‘sophisticated’ markets are producing more conservative, safer work on the whole. &nbsp;Of course, there are exceptions to this rule but this is my view based on my judging at lots of awards juries over many years. &nbsp;Brazil and South America generally have given us some truly amazing work recently whereas the UK and the US not so much so. &nbsp;This might be because the UK and US are global hubs and have to make work that is suitable for many different markets. Or it might be because there are lots of levels of clients and focus groups! My prediction for the future? &nbsp;Keep an eye on Africa and Russia.</p> <p>American’s tend to value the sheer amount of work produced. &nbsp;They are focused on the quantity of output; they work incredibly hard and have few holidays. &nbsp;In Europe we tend to be a little more relaxed about things and we do love lots of theory and research! In markets that have emerged and matured in recent years, the Far East and South America, there is still a real buzz, an energy. &nbsp;While in markets such as Australia and New Zealand they are refreshingly &nbsp;straight forward in their approach to creativity and business in general.</p> <p>I’d be a detective. &nbsp;A super sleuth. Maybe I’ve watched way too much TV but I think it would be absolutely fascinating. &nbsp;I reckon I’d be pretty good at catching criminals.</p> <p>David Droga is the person in advertising who inspires me. &nbsp;No one else comes close. Everyone at Ogilvy in London is probably bored rigid with my quoting David Droga at them. &nbsp;And constantly referencing Droga5 work. &nbsp;</p> <p>Digital ads won’t completely displace print ads so long as print is a medium we engage with. &nbsp;And I believe it will be. Very few innovations completely surplant pre-existing stuff. &nbsp;But they may cause the latter to change somewhat. &nbsp;Look at bookshops. &nbsp;The advent of Amazon did not cause them to disappear but they have evolved. Now they serve coffee or wine and host book club events. &nbsp;They are social gathering spaces as well as just being retailers. &nbsp;So print ads will not die but they may evolve to be more relevant to the way we live now.</p> <p>I obviously could not live without my husband and children, I’m sure most people will agree. &nbsp;So my five things are in addition to them;</p> <p>The changing seasons in London.</p> <p>Firework Night.</p> <p>Black Taxis.</p> <p>My Nan’s recipe for chicken soup.</p> <p>The wildlife in the city.</p>

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